Living With Sarcoma

You’re Not Alone

The first thing you should know is that you are not alone. Most people are surviving sarcoma in the world today. Previously sarcomas were managed with radical resections with no attention paid to function. In the past two decades, significant progress has occurred in the management of patients with musculoskeletal cancers, that has improved both the survival and the quality of life of afflicted patients. Changes in the management of these patients have mirrored trends in the entire field of oncology.

To put your diagnosis in context, you should know a little about sarcoma and its place within the range of cancers. The annual incidence in the United States, which remains relatively constant, is approximately 6,000-7,000 soft tissue and 2,500 bone sarcomas.1 In comparison, the estimated number of new cancers in 2005 was 1,372,910.2

With a rare and complex disease such as sarcoma, it is important to seek the best possible care to improve your chance of survival. You should consider a team approach to your care. A medical oncologist, radiation oncologist and orthopaedic surgeon will work together to treat your sarcoma. Pain management specialists, social workers and physical therapists assist in your treatment plan.

If you’re reading this website you are taking a good first step, and it is encouraged that you learn more about your treatment options so that you can participate fully in your care.